Subject: avian cholera
Date: Feb 28 10:15:13 1994
From: Tom Lathrop - tgl at SSD.KODAK.COM


An outbreak of duck virus enteritis, also known as DVE or duck plague, has
killed at least 500 birds in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York.
Most of these have been Black Ducks and Mallards. There is great concern
that this could spread to the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge when
spring waterfowl migration begins there in a few weeks. The ponds at
Montezuma NWR are still frozen now, but should be open sometime in March.
There is a meeting tomorrow of "wildlife scientists" from the US federal
government, Canada, New York State, and the Province of Ontario at Montezuma
to discuss the problem.

This is only the second reported outbreak of this disease in the wild in
the US. In 1973, it killed 40,000 birds in the Lake Andes NWR in South
Dakota.

Tom Lathrop
Rochester, NY
tgl at ssd.kodak.com
=========================================

From: ww12 <Walter_F_WILLIAMS at UMAIL.UMD.EDU>

Re: The report of DVE in NY, avian cholera has been reported now in the
Chesapeake Bay (MD and VA). 20,000+ dead birds. It is also now in the
mountain states of (apparently) CO, WY, MT, ID.
=========================================

From: Gerry Rising <INSRISG at UBVMS.bitnet>

For general information, here is an article copied in its entirety
from this morning's (March 6th) BUFFALO NEWS:

WNY waterfowl expected
to dodge deadly virus

>From News Staff and Wire Reports

A virus killing hundreds of waterfowl weakened
by the tough winter is not expected to affect birds
on the Niagara Frontier, according to state
officials.

Wildlife officials from the United States and
Canada met last week at the federal Montezuma
refuge west of Syracuse to discuss ways of
minimizing an outbreak of the duck virus enteritis.
Known as *duck plague* for short, it has been
reported in recent weeks in the Finger Lakes region
of central New York.

Experts call it the biggest outbreak in 20
years.

Since the Finger Lakes region is a popular
stopping-off point for migrating waterfowl in
spring and fall, officials feared the infection
could spread to flocks throughout the East Coast.

State biologists have been spraying weak bleach
solutions in areas where carcasses have been found.

Biologists estimate that more than 200,000 ducks
and geese pass through the Finger Lakes during a
typical spring migration. Tens of thousands more
spend the winter in the region.

The disease is spread through the urine and
feces of waterfowl, or through the bodies of birds
killed by the virus, said Mike Hall, senior
wildlife biologist with the state Department of
Environmental Conservation.

The particularly cold recent weather probably is
a *blessing in disguise,* discouraging the ducks
from their normal migratory patterns and giving his
agency time to clean up the existing carcasses and
take steps to kill the virus before it spreads
further, he added.

*We really donUt expect this to spread to
Western New York, the Alabama Swamp or other
popular migratory layovers. ItUs been fairly well
confined and isolated to the Three Fingers (sic)
lake regions.* he said.

*If the weather begins to heat up and open
bodies of waters on lakes begin to appear, we may
have a problem but, frankly, we donUt expect that
to happen.*

-----------------------------------------------
Gerry Rising insrisg at ubvms.bitnet
295 Robinhill Drive insrisg at ubvms.cc.buffalo.edu
Williamsville, NY 14221-1639 716-689-8301
-----------------------------------------------
===============================

From: Tom Lathrop <tgl at SSD.KODAK.COM>

An outbreak of duck virus enteritis, also known as DVE or duck plague, has
killed at least 500 birds in the Finger Lakes region of upstate New York.
Most of these have been Black Ducks and Mallards. There is great concern
that this could spread to the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge when
spring waterfowl migration begins there in a few weeks. The ponds at
Montezuma NWR are still frozen now, but should be open sometime in March.
There is a meeting tomorrow of "wildlife scientists" from the US federal
government, Canada, New York State, and the Province of Ontario at Montezuma
to discuss the problem.

This is only the second reported outbreak of this disease in the wild in
the US. In 1973, it killed 40,000 birds in the Lake Andes NWR in South
Dakota.

Tom Lathrop
Rochester, NY
tgl at ssd.kodak.com
=================================

From: Les Willis <cwillis at INFI.NET>

Just a question:

We are currently having an outbreak of avian cholera in the Chesapeake Bay
area. 8,000 birds have been picked up so far. What potential human health
risks, if any, are there by going to areas with concentrations of waterfowl.
In particular, I have two small children that I take birding with me and I
don't want to get into any risky situations.

Another question, as the only birds affected so far are waterfowl, are the
birds I feed, goldfinches, etc., also at risk? I live right along a river.
I don't feed ducks. Should I stop feeding passerines?

Just wondering
--
at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at = at
Les Willis Operating the Virginia Birdline (804) 238-2713
CWILLIS at WYVERN.WYVERN.COM
Voice: (804) 238-9935 Fax: (804) 238-9145
Suffolk, Virginia
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============================================

From: John Tebbutt <tebbutt at RHINO.NCSL.NIST.GOV>

>From John Tebbutt
Frederick, MD
tebbutt at rhino.ncsl.nist.gov

I've heard that avian cholera poses no threat to humans, and that within the
bird kingdom it affects primarily waterfowl, as it is transmitted through feces
and water.

JT