Subject: Washington State RBA, May 7, 1995
Date: May 7 21:42:38 1995
From: Russell Rogers - rrogers


You have reached the Seattle Audubon's Bird Sightings Hotline for Sunday,
May 7, 1995, at 11:00 AM.

To skip the details and just leave a message punch 5 and wait for the
tone.

For sick or injured birds call PAWS at 743-3845 [or 743-1884].

Many thanks to the Bird Brain for many years of Service. We all hope that
he can now find many new birds to report with his new found freedom.

For the most up to date information on rare birds call the Washington
Ornithological Society's Bird Box. It is an interactive tape where you can
hear reports of the latest sightings and leave reports in turn. Call
206-454-2662 to tap into this new service.

Topping this weeks reports, a BREWER'S SPARROW was seen at the Montlake
Fill, on the University of Washington Campus on April 27th. This is
possibly the first report of this species in Western Washington.
Remarkably, as second BREWER'S SPARROW was reported from a P-Patch next to
Dall Field, near NE 80th & 25th NE in Seattle.

There are still a few lingering winter sparrows. A SWAMP SPARROW was seen
at the "River SP unit", of the Ridgefield NWR, in Clark County, on April
26th. This is just south of the town of Ridgefield. The HARRIS'S SPARROW
that was reported throughout the winter at the Edmonds Marsh, in Edmonds,
was last reported on April 26th in full breeding plumage. And lastly a
WHITE-THROATED SPARROW was seen at Ocean Shores on April 29th.

A BLACK-SHOULDERED KITE was reported from Nisqually NWR on April 29th.
There have been no reports since then.

Belle and Stewart, the nesting pair of PEREGRINE FALCONS down town
Seattle, now have three fuzzy little chicks, which all hatched within
hours of each other on May 2nd.

WESTERN TANAGER, PACIFIC SLOPE FLYCATCHER, WARBLING VIREO, SOLITARY VIREO,
BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER, YELLOW WARBLER, and WILSON WARBLER are all
being reported widely throughout western Washington. The first report of a
OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER was from Bainbridge Island on May 6th.

Point No Point, in northern Kitsap County, has been a good spot for
migrants more typical east of the Cascades the past week or so, a
NASHVILLE WARBLER on April 25, a YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD on April 26 and
on May 1st, 4 WESTERN KINGBIRDS and a PRAIRIE FALCON were noted.

At the Montlake fill, some other interesting migrants in addition to the
BREWER'S SPARROW, this past week have been a YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD and
BULLOCK'S ORIOLE on May 4th. Many shorebirds reported there as well
including SOLITARY SANDPIPER, GREATER YELLOWLEGS, LESSER YELLOWLEGS, LEAST
SANDPIPER and WESTERN SANDPIPER.

A WESTERN KINGBIRD saw seen near the Kent Ponds on April 30th.

A CHIPPING SPARROW was on Vashion Island also on April 30th.

The shorebird migration at Bowerman Basin is in full swing. Thousands of
DUNLIN, WESTERN SANDPIPER, DOWITCHER, and RED KNOT are moving through. A
pair of BLACK OYSTERCATCHERS have been seen at the Game Range off and on
through at least April 29th.

East of the Cascade Crest, a ROSS'S GOOSE was in Richland on May 5th.
AMERICAN AVOCET, BLACK-NECKED STILT, GREAT EGRET, CLARK'S GREBE, and
FOSTERS TERNS are being reported widely throughout the Columbia Basin.

For SAS field trips, or for information on conservation and education
issues please call the office at 523-4483 during office hours, 10-4 Monday
through Friday and 10-2 Saturday.

That's all for now. If you have news to report, wait for the tone, then
give your name, phone number, and the details. Thanks and good birding.