Subject: [Tweeters] Regarding Robins
Date: Tue Jul 13 15:37:28 PDT 2021
From: Michael Hobbs - birdmarymoor at gmail.com

What I've understood, though I don't remember a source, is that many of our
breeding robins migrate south, replaced by wintering robins from further
north and/or from higher elevations.

But maybe there is post breeding dispersal *to* the higher elevations, and
then they return when things get too cold up there.

Both seem plausible to me, but does anyone have actual information?

- Michael Hobbs

On Tue, Jul 13, 2021, 3:28 PM David Hutchinson <florafaunabooks at hotmail.com>
wrote:


> The comment on the dearth of American Robins I think is correct.

> I remember a WOS Mtg lecture on migration by a lady from BC, who

> asked the question: "how often do you see a Robin in August here".

> I rushed off to take a look at the monthly bird census for our Capehhart

> site in Discovery Park. Lo and behold the statement was largely

> correct. Throughout the year there were peaks and valleys for Robin nos.

> From mid-June their numbers steadily dropped until early September.

> A decline through July, with August partic empty. Then a large peak in

> mid-Oct.

>

> Now why that is would be another matter. Ground too hard for probing?

> Certainly our mid-summer is full of native berries for local birds from

> Bushtits to Flickers. Perhaps the berry-crop for Robins is much better in

> our Cascade Mtns, where Robins might go on mass??

> David Hutchinson

> 206-499-7305

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